cat-letterstotheeditor

Friday, 19 June 2015 13:43

Letters to the editor

Tuesday, 28 April 2015 16:13

Happiness is a northbound Yankee

In the April 22 edition of Lake Norman Citizen (Lori) Helms tells me that I "should hug a Yankee" today. Well Mrs. Helms, with all due respect, I think I will pass. Not because I view Yankees as "sub-human" or something, or even that I dislike them. I just can't agree that I owe them a hug because my Southern way of life would somehow be missing "had a bunch of Northerner's not migrated" here.

On the contrary. I feel my lifestyle is missing because of the Northern migration. Matter of fact, the Southern way of living is non-existent in Lake Norman! They have taken our quiet simple way of life and replaced it with a "fast-paced" northern way of life because "that's how they do it up north." I hear northerners say they love it here because of "the Southern charm and hospitality." What Southern charm and hospitality? There are no Southerners left around Lake Norman to provide "Southern charm and hospitality".

Tuesday, 28 April 2015 16:13

Happiness is a northbound Yankee

In the April 22 edition of Lake Norman Citizen (Lori) Helms tells me that I "should hug a Yankee" today. Well Mrs. Helms, with all due respect, I think I will pass. Not because I view Yankees as "sub-human" or something, or even that I dislike them. I just can't agree that I owe them a hug because my Southern way of life would somehow be missing "had a bunch of Northerner's not migrated" here.

On the contrary. I feel my lifestyle is missing because of the Northern migration. Matter of fact, the Southern way of living is non-existent in Lake Norman! They have taken our quiet simple way of life and replaced it with a "fast-paced" northern way of life because "that's how they do it up north." I hear northerners say they love it here because of "the Southern charm and hospitality." What Southern charm and hospitality? There are no Southerners left around Lake Norman to provide "Southern charm and hospitality".

Tuesday, 30 December 2014 23:57

Your column spoke to this mother

This letter is in response to Lori Helms' Final Thoughts piece titled "Sights and sounds of Saturdays will never be the same" in the Dec. 17 edition of the Citizen.

Editor,

(Lori Helms') column about your son was heartfelt, unexpected and personal.

I sat down this morning at my kitchen table to read Cornelius Today, the Weekly Herald and Lake Norman Citizen. I read all kinds of things that made me think and made me frustrated (especially the DDI atrocity, the Dirty Santa Christmas Party ad, the blessing and the curse of the real estate gluttony), but it was your column that resonated and made me glad I took the time to have my coffee with the local papers.

Tuesday, 04 November 2014 16:50

Letters to the Editor for November 5, 2014

Someone please explain the DDI

Editor,

I would like someone to explain to me how four vehicle traffic lanes crossing each other ... TWICE ... is more efficient than the old-fashioned, run-of-the-mill four lanes passing each other ... ONCE. I am referring to the disaster under construction at I-77 Exit 28, known by some as the Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI).

Has anyone counted the number of traffic lights at that squirrel's nest? The photo in the Oct. 29 issue of the Lake Norman Citizen shows from the air how ridiculous this design is. Anyone in a car trying to negotiate that mess at ground level knows how ridiculous it is. The Citizen article mentions the foot traffic across the bridge, and touts the pedestrian path in the ... MIDDLE ... of the diamond. Did anyone ask if historically there has been a throng of foot traffic across the bridge BEFORE the infamous DDI? Did anyone ask if there are heavily traveled sidewalks that lead up to the bridge?

Look at the aerial picture of the DDI. Where is that foot traffic supposed to come from, and how is it going to make its way to that center walkway over the bridge ... and why? Even if you could argue that the center pedestrian path would be useful, how on earth does it make sense for the vehicle traffic lanes to cross each other ... and the pedestrian traffic ... TWICE? Be it known that if I can find out which politicians voted to approve the DDI design, I will vote for the opponents of those politicians.

— Derryl Berry, Cornelius

Okay, Mommy, let's go to school

The following is in response to Lori Helms' opinion piece, "The whole truth, or simply tall tales," which appeared in the Oct. 15 edition of the Citizen.

Well Lori (Helms), since you're a mommy you must have kids. And I'll bet they're either in school or have been in school. So let's talk about something us moms can relate to. Instead of talking roads, let's apply I-77 toll logic to schools. Here's what the folks in Raleigh might have to say:

Dear Mommy,

Thank you for your inquiry. We know your kid's school is way over-crowded. That's because we haven't improved it since the Carter Administration. Unfortunately we don't have the money to fix it and quite frankly we're sick of your complaining.

We know your kid is one of 40 in a classroom designed to hold half that many, but don't worry, we're going to make sure two kids of 40 per class will have a quality education. Those lucky kids will attend a school that has every conceivable amenity from a juice bar to girl's lacrosse. We call it Spiffy School.

How do you get your kid into this utopia of learning? You pony up the old cashola and bid against every other parent. If your bid comes in third, sorry, your kid stays put. See, we're giving you mommies a choice: utopia or gulag. Hey, no one is forcing you to keep your kid in the gulag school.

We don't know how to build Spiffy Schools so we hired experts from Spain. The Spaniards have even built a couple escuelas here in the U.S. Both of those projects went bankrupt within five years but you should ignore that. You should also forget that three other experts checked out this project and then high-tailed it back to Brazil and Portugal.

These Spaniards weren't an easy catch. Before they agreed to build Spiffy School we had to donate the land. We had to cough up the down payment. If tuition dollars don't roll in like they should, we're going to shell out the difference. And we're going to let them charge whatever tuition they want. For fifty years. Yes, your kid's kid and your kid's kid's kid will be wiring pesetas back to Spain, but that's two generations from now so you should just forget about that, too.

Despite our obvious brilliance some mommies on the PTA board were unconvinced. To win them over we sent a truckload of cash-stuffed pinatas to the last PTA meeting. We really don't care how they spend it and you should not, under any circumstance, ask us where that money came from.

You should also ignore the fact that we're never ever going to improve that jam-packed mad house your kid is in now. If your neighborhood had good schools, families might actually want to move there and that would be a terrible thing. And the Spaniards know that the more crowded your kid's school gets ... the more you're going to bid to escape.

They're the experts, remember?

Quite frankly we're sick and tired of mommies like you asking a bunch of stupid questions. We know most mommies are so dense they wouldn't recognize a brilliant idea if it slammed into their minivan.

So you should just trust us when we say Spiffy School will cost us folks in Raleigh a tenth of what a new school would. You should not, under any circumstance, remember that Spiffy School will only serve a lucky couple of kids from each class. You should forget about all that money heading across the pond. You should forget you paid taxes in the first place.

And you should never ever dare ask us how much you're going to pay for tuition. If you do, we've got a really mad mommy who's going to put you in time out.

We hope this clarifies the situation.

Sincerely,

Your Betters In Raleigh

— Pattie Marshall, Mooresville

Wednesday, 16 July 2014 07:28

Letters to the Editor for July 16, 2014

How can there be so little funding?

The very basic question/comments I have are:

1- I shouldn’t need to fully understand the intricate details of the agreement or traffic solution methods as our taxpayer $ pay for NCDOT and CRTPO staff to look out for our best interest.

2- How is it that with explosive growth experienced by LKN over the last 15 years there is neither the financial resources nor a priority level commensurate with the economic impact the area has on the region? Fuel (highway funds) as well as other fees certainly have increased many fold and yet there are insufficient monies to apply to needed infrastructure in a reasonably timely manner.

Wednesday, 09 July 2014 15:26

Lake Norman is sexy and we know it

In the last few weeks, Motovo.com, a real estate website, ranked the Lake Norman town of Cornelius as the fourth sexiest community in the nation and Huntersville as the seventh most exciting town in North Carolina.


In addition, Ashley Madison (ashleymadison.com), an online dating service that caters to people already in relationships, says Huntersville leads its rankings of the “Most Unfaithful Neighborhoods” in the Charlotte area. The rankings were based on the percentage of membership from respective ZIP codes in the region.

My first take on reading the Ashley Madison statistic was astonishment.  First, that there was a website that encouraged that type of behavior. Second,  I was not aware the Town of Huntersville was a neighborhood of Charlotte. But I suppose when you have sexy and exciting folks living near each other, it stands to reason they might be susceptible to temptation.

At my last check, there are approximately 500,000 words in the English language and there are 100,000 or so adjectives.  I suspect over the summer, we’re liable to hear quite a few more accolades from these online websites.  Perhaps Davidson will earn the “Most Educated” and Mooresville will be declared the “Fastest City” with all of its race shops and drivers who reside in the region.

All that said, the adjectives sexy and exciting are not lost on the business community.  At the Lake Norman Chamber’s June “Lunch and Learn” event, we had the opportunity to hear from the owners of our outstanding Small Businesses of the Year.  The one word that continued to resonate with the three business owners — Dr. John Ballas, Armin Desch and Penny Benkeser — was “passion.”

Ballas, owner of Ballas Chiropractic in Huntersville pointed out that to succeed, you must create a plan of action and hire employees to get it done.  Ballas said, “Hire people and associates who share your vision and passion.”  Penny Benkeser, whose business Servpro of Northwest Charlotte has grown 400 percent in 18 months, pointed out, “Don’t limit your benchmarks to your market or region.  Look across the board — across the nation and find the very best.  Use those examples as your benchmark and surpass them!”

Desch shared that the secret to his business success started with his employees. He reminded us all, “Treat your people special and they will in turn treat your customers special.”

Ballas Chiropractic was named the Small Business of the Year in large part because of Ballas’ hiring practices. “My dad gave me great advice,” he said. “Treat people with respect and empower your people.  I hire slow, fire fast, train hard — and manage soft.”

“Take your time to hire the right people,” he continued. “Give employees every opportunity to perform their job, but if they do not meet expected levels of performance, move them out. ... Train your folks hard and then get out of their way.”

When all three of our Small Business of the Year finalists were asked if they had any final thoughts about success to share, John, Armin and Penny looked at each other and agreed, “It all keeps going back to passion.”

Maybe Motovo.com is on to something.  Some think of us as exciting.  Others might find us sexy. But one thing for sure — in the Lake Norman region, we’re passionate about business.
 
Bill Russell is the president of the Lake Norman Chamber of Commerce with approximately 1,000 members in the Cornelius, Davidson, Huntersville and greater Lake Norman region.

Wednesday, 28 May 2014 12:24

Letters to the Editor for May 28, 2014

We can be patient

Editor,

Thank you for John Deem’s article (“‘Private’ Huntersville couple enters very public fight,” the Citizen, May 21, 2014).  I am one man and have been happily married to one woman for 33 years and never felt I needed the help of the state to protect our marriage.

After moving to Huntersville in 2008, we were extremely happy until the passage of Amendment One in 2012 made us question our decision to move (to North Carolina). ... But I guess if Joanne Marinaro and Cathy Fry can live here and actually wait patiently for change, perhaps we can also.

  — Mark Jackson, Huntersville

Wednesday, 26 February 2014 08:07

Letters to the Editor for February 26, 2014

Thanks for trees at Exit 25

This is overdue but I want to thank the people responsible for taking down the diseased tulip poplars that were all around Exit 25 and also near the North County Regional Library and replacing them with new trees!  The old spooky trees will not be missed and those flowering, strong, beautiful trees are a much better representation of the Huntersville community.  Thank You!

— Cara Devine

What about traffic noise?

Editor,

This is in response to the people complaining about the planes flying too low and making too much noise:

 We have a similar problem here in Huntersville’s Greenfield Park except our noise comes from traffic on I-77 and it lasts all day, not just during rush hour, as it used to be, and it gets worse each year. We cannot enjoy having friends and family over and having a cookout on our back deck or just simply carrying on a conversation because the noise is so loud you cannot be heard. We have to shout to each other across the yard if we are doing yard work. We also have traffic noise from Highway 21.

As far as I know, no one in the neighborhood has complained to the Town of Huntersville, Mecklenburg County or the North Carolina Department of Transportation. Do you think the DOT will reroute the traffic on 77  if we complain? What about a “noise barrier?

“These homes have been here since before 77 was built and nothing has been done about the noise so far. Have a glass of wine with that whine and grow up! We live with the noise every day. You can, too! Or you can move.

— Linda Warren, Huntersville

Letter writers have no right to complain

Editor,

It was interesting to see these three letters with opposing viewpoints concerning the jet noise complaints over Lake Norman. However, a quick property search shows that Margaret McKinney and Bill Pryor do not live on the lake side of Huntersville. Instead, they live about six or seven miles away from the flight path over the lower end of the lake.

They have absolutely no right to dismiss the legitimate noise complaints of the residents under the current flight path. They should count their blessings that they don’t have to endure this nightmare. There is no record of a Rigler anywhere in Mecklenburg County, so I don’t think Gedd has any right to dismiss these concerns, either. The fact is that the planes are very low, very loud, and very frequent.

— William C. (posted at lakenormancitizen.com)

State should stop lottery advertising

Editor,

North Carolina should stop spending the $15.3 million it wastes on lottery advertising each year. Give the money to teachers, provide facilities funding for charter schools, augment other government services, anything; but cease the barrage of commercials. We have too many other needs.

 North Carolina law states that “advertising shall not exceed one percent of the total (lottery) revenues.” So what does the Lottery Commission do? Predictably, it spends the maximum it can from the $1.65 billion annual lottery take. The statutes go on to read, “Lottery advertising shall be tastefully designed and presented in a manner to minimize the appeal of lottery games to minors. The use of cartoon characters or of false, misleading, or deceptive information in lottery advertising is prohibited.”

The drumming of Ric Flair’s “whoo” alone was enough to violate both the “cartoon character” and the “appeal of lottery games to minors” provisions above. Who else would those ads appeal to? Plus, after nearly a decade since the North Carolina Senate’s 2005 vote shenanigans, the public knows there is a lottery in the state. How? There are 7,000 retail locations plastered with signage lest one forget.

Also, the lottery is not really a game but a voluntary state tax. We don’t advertise the North Carolina State Income Tax. The latter actually contributes a larger percentage of its revenue to education than does the lottery.

It’s time to scratch off lottery advertising.

 — Eddie Goodall, Weddington

Wednesday, 19 February 2014 11:29

Letters to the Editor for February 19, 2014

 

Plane noise better than post 9/11 silence

Editor,

I just finished reading Lee Sullivan’s article regarding the flight pattern change at the airport. It is a very good article, but the part I  liked the best was when you quoted the pilot saying that around military airports it is called the sound of freedom.

I believe the “noise” over Huntersville, etc., is the sound of freedom as well.  I remember the silence after 9/11, so I am comforted in hearing the sound and knowing, that for now, the skies are still safe to fly.  And, after many years, I am still fascinated by watching them. Thank you for you article.

— Margaret McKinney, Huntersville

Wednesday, 29 January 2014 08:05

Cable ownership straps Davidson

Editor,

I very much enjoyed John Deem’s article on the Davidson Fire Department “DFD’s overnight response challenge,” the Citizen, Jan. 22).  I was particularly interested in your comments regarding the deferral of fire department upgrades and establishing a location east of town, close to River Run. That would be an excellent investment of the town’s funds.  You note that estimates have ranged from $545,000 to $1.6 million.  Although that may seem quite a lot, I have no doubt that it would pay for itself in added safety and peace of mind for the Davidson citizens.